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Renton Highlands Tiny Remodeled & Ready for $200K

Welcome to Tiny Homes, an idea that is more popular with minimalists than with neighborhood associations and zoning boards. We'll point out the fun parts. You'll have to check out the logistics and legalities - but this one's been around a while, and someone has already remodeled the inside.


Stainless steel appliance and granite countertops are so common in expensive homes that they become an expectation. Put them in a 700 square-foot house that has 2 bedrooms and 1 bath, and that goes for $200,000, and the upgrades are obvious and appreciated. This tiny house was built in Renton in 1952, just before the launch of the jet age. The outside may not look much different, but the inside does.

How'd that style get here? Look at the outside and it is red brick, composite shingles, flat lawn, and a few shrubs. It is hard to remodel bricks. You can paint them, but that doesn't always work well. The roof usually isn't a great opportunity either. That leaves you with redoing the lawn and the landscaping. Start planting! Unless you like it the way it is. There's something to be said for not being overly ornate or ostentatious.

Get inside though, and it looks like someone with style actually got to do some real work. The walls aren't just painted sheetrock. It may just be wallpaper, but at least it has some elegance to it.

The kitchen would be a great opportunity for a before and after photo, because it probably didn't look this good before the new appliances and countertops came in. This isn't a 1952 kitchen, and it doesn't look like it could fit in a 700 square foot house, but it evidently it does.

The house may be going through a split personality disorder considering the difference between inside and outside. Of course, maybe you want to have a facade that hides your comforts. Humble and dated on the outside. Cozy and modern on the inside. Keep them all guessing.
· 3501 NE 6th Pl [Zillow]
· All Tiny Homes coverage [CS]
Written by Tom Trimbath