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Dexter Horton Family Estate in Mt. Baker Lists For $2.7M

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Designed by Seattle architect David J. Meyers, the seven-bedroom residence is a striking example of Tudor Revival architecture and has now entered the market asking $2.695M

Seattleites know the name Dexter Horton. It's the name on the 15-story building at Second Avenue and Cherry Street built in 1924 to honor the founder of the first bank in Seattle. Horton died in 1904 but his family remained valued members of the community. In 1915, Horton’s daughter Rebecca married Samuel Tritheway and they moved into the then-new home at 3260 Lakewood Avenue S in Mount Baker.

Designed by Seattle architect David J. Meyers, former President of the American Institute of Architects, the seven-bedroom residence is a striking example of Tudor Revival architecture and has now entered the market asking $2.695M.

Much has changed since the home was built but the views of Lake Washington and the Cascades from all three levels of this Seattle landmark home remain relatively the same. Also remaining the same are many of the original features still intact, including carved bargeboards, the patterned brick and concrete walkway, and a paneled oak front door with its original oak screen door. The paneling in the living room and dining room is Siberian oak, a tree that has since gone extinct.

There have been tons of renovations and upgrades as well. Most recently in 2015 the hardwood floors on first floor were completely refinished and the basement bonus room was upgraded to include a new bathroom, pantry, and lighting. The kitchen was remodeled in 2012.

You'll also notice the Horton Family Crest in leaded glass included in various windows throughout the house. While many other families have called this place home, the family that helped get Seattle off the ground gets to keep their mark around here. Fair enough.
· 3260 Lakewood Ave S [Windermere]
· Dexter Horton [Wiki]