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Pristine Paul Hayden Kirk midcentury modern home asks $550K

Located in Kent, this home lets trees become the walls

HD Estates/Courtesy of Urban Living

Tucked away on a quiet, wooded Kent hillside is a hidden gem: a 1959 midcentury modern stunner by Paul Hayden Kirk. Like other acclaimed architects of the era, Kirk was known for sleuthing out wooded pockets to build homes that use unadorned, natural materials to complement the natural wonders around them. In this case, it’s wrapped in glass, letting the forest serve as the outer walls.

Sometimes, Northwest midcentury is so tangled with the setting that it can come out looking unassuming, even boring. While this home is immeasurably enhanced by its surroundings, it stands alone as gorgeous, too. Darkly stained wood beams create a frame for a peaked roof that extends out to create a shady back porch.

Inside, the exposed beams create the aesthetic of a cabin without roughing it—and it’s only been altered as necessary to keep everything polished and functional. The seclusion of the setting allow for for the upper floor to be almost completely encased in glass without sacrificing privacy.

The home—architectural prestige and all—is listed for $550,000.

A classic roofline adds some visible structure atop walls of windows.
While the cooktop has recently been replaced with a new, gas model, the original oven is in great working order—so it stuck around.
Separated from the kitchen by a translucent divider, a living area is topped by skylights and bounded on either side by trees and ivy.
A thick fireplace also serves as a room divider between the living and dining area, providing the opportunity for fireside lounging or dining.
The master bedroom is afforded a little more privacy, but a sliver of floor-to-ceiling window and a shorter window bank still draw in the surroundings.
Entering from the carport downstairs—or descending a staircase from the living room—a simple basement contains a sparse utility room and an office.