clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
A cliff edge with a rainbow in Snoqualmie. At the edge of the cliff is a waterfall and trees. There are houses on the cliff and mountains in the distance.
Salish Lodge & Spa in Snoqualmie, Washington.
Courtesy of Salish Lodge & Spa

21 of Seattle and Puget Sound’s best wedding venues

Choosing where to tie the knot in the Emerald City and beyond

View as Map
Salish Lodge & Spa in Snoqualmie, Washington.
| Courtesy of Salish Lodge & Spa

If you and your honey are getting hitched, there’s no shortage of potential venues in Seattle and greater Puget Sound where you two can say, “I do.” There are indoor and outdoor options, small spaces for teeny-tiny ceremonies, locales that are on the water, out of the rain, and under the radar.

Choosing a venue—a decision upon which other wedding day considerations hinge—can be a bit stressful. Researching, touring, and visualizing what your celebration might look like in various spaces and learning more about your own priorities along the way can be fun, too. (That and the cake-testing.) Once selected, newly betrotheds can start to hone in on their venue’s possibilities and confirm other details to personalize their nuptials.

So, whichever tone you want to strike—highfalutin’ with downtown views, laid back with mountains in the distance, just you two and a judge, or something else entirely—here are some A+ options to consider for your big day.

Map points are ordered north to south.

Read More
Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

The Wayfarer

Copy Link

With an abundance of excellent options, couples hoping to get married on Whidbey Island are spoilt for choice; places like the Historic Crockett Barn, Dancing Fish Vineyards, and Jenne Farm. But Wayfarer Farm’s five acres in the historic Bayview area seem prime for a laidback garden wedding. With mature trees, open, grassy spaces, and a long, community-style reception table under a green canopy, weddings at the Wayfarer look like a backyard party, with low-pressure and convivial moods all around.

Dairyland

Copy Link

Woodland Meadow Farms’ Dairyland event space is an hour north of Seattle, in Snohomish—the “Northwest’s antique capital.” The former dairy farm’s centerpiece is its rustic, restored barn featuring whitewashed shiplap walls and a tall, exposed-beam ceiling. Dairyland allows outside catering and alcohol, offers longer-than-usual rental periods, and all its rentals include tables, chairs, parking, and a one-hour rehearsal. Surrounded by farms (and a brewery), the property teems with fruits and hops depending on the time of year.

Red Cedar Farm

Copy Link

The centerpiece of this working farm is a renovated, century-old barn. Its interior is covered in exposed, light-colored wood, concrete floors, and thoughtful details—like a collectible Coca-Cola advertising signs and an old gas pump—that reinforce the barn’s country vibe. The indoor space flows onto a back patio, which sits underneath the warm glow of string lights. Lush plantings cover much of the venue’s 35 acres, but Red Cedar Farm is also home to a brood of animals, including pigs, donkeys, horses, and goats.

Woodinville Lavender

Copy Link

Nestled in the Sammamish River Valley, Woodinville Lavender’s purple-tinged gardens make for an attractive backdrop unique to the region. A one-stop-shop, rentals at Woodinville Lavender include their Valley View Room, Farm Terrace Patio, a bride’s quarters, greenhouse, and lawn. Just 30 minutes from Seattle in Woodinville wine country, this elegant wedding and reception venue can host 50 people indoors and under its covered spaces or 80 for an outdoor gathering. Keep in mind that lavender typically blooms from June through August.

The MV Skansonia

Copy Link

From 1929 to 1967 the MV Skansonia ferried passengers between Tacoma’s Point Defiance and Gig Harbor. Now in retirement, the ferryboat is permanently docked on the north shore of Seattle’s Lake Union, just east of the Ship Canal Bridge. Bedecked in vintage nautical garb—including ring buoys and ship’s wheels—and featuring city, water, and Space Needle views, the MV Skansonia has been a one-of-a-kind PNW wedding venue for more than 35 years.

Fremont Foundry

Copy Link

Opened in 1981 as an artist’s hub, the building that houses The Foundry has played an important part in making funky Fremont what it is. Before Seattle’s beloved Jimi Hendrix statue graced the corner of Broadway and East Pine Street, it was created by artist Daryl Smith in the Foundry’s space in 1997. It’s also where Fremont’s controversial Vladimir Lenin statue was reconstructed after being brought over from Slovakia in 1989. As a wedding venue, The Foundry offers an industrial alternative to the popular shabby chic, barn-style wedding style. The building’s rooftop terrace offers views of the neighborhood and the Aurora Bridge.

Parsons Gardens

Copy Link

A six-minute walk from Queen Anne’s Kerry Park—a popular destination boasting iconic, Frasier-level views of downtown and Mount Rainier—it’s incredible how removed Parsons Garden feels from the bustle. Formerly the family garden of Seattle businessman and philanthropist Reginald Parsons, the garden was donated to the City of Seattle in 1956. This hidden, corner-lot gem is concealed from passersby by towering foliage. The park itself is covered in flowering plants and trees, and its open, grassy lawn is suitable for small ceremonies.

The Center for Wooden Boats

Copy Link

The Center for Wooden Boats is one of Seattle’s most beloved maritime heritage organizations—a hands-on museum meant to preserve long-standing traditions and skills and where the exhibits themselves are in the water. The rentable space—which is suited for weddings on the smaller side—sits among the center’s collection of vessels, with a marina to the east, the Space Needle and Naval Reserve Building to the west, and Lake Union and its seaplanes and kayaks to the north.

King County Courthouse

Copy Link

Sure, the wedding-related verbiage on King County’s website isn’t as flowery as it is on other wedding venue websites. Big deal! A courthouse wedding can mean less stress, a shorter engagement, the ability to focus on just the important details, and not starting your married lives on a mountain of wedding-related debt. Note that fees vary by judge and weddings can be performed before 8:30 a.m., after 4:30 p.m., or on weekends and holidays by appointment only.

Shotgun Ceremonies

Copy Link

Do the dang thing in a jiffy at Shotgun Ceremonies in Pioneer Square, a Vegas-style wedding chapel that specializes in kitsch-forward ceremonies. The chapel can accommodate parties of two to 30, and offsite ceremonies are an option, too. Wedding packages range from $299 to $349 and come with an officiant, an interactive, individualized ceremony, and marriage license paperwork (they’ll even file it for you). Add Elvis for $150. If the average cost of getting hitched has you all shook up, this might be the place for you.

The Great Hall at Union Station

Copy Link

The Great Hall at Union Station exudes history ($), grandeur ($$), and opulence ($$$). Dating back to 1910—just 40 years after Seattle was incorporated—the station was built to serve the Union Pacific Railroad and the Milwaukee Road. Union Station facilitated the movement of travelers until passenger service was discontinued in 1971. Today, the station’s Great Hall is an 11,000-square-foot, Beaux-Arts-style event space, complete with nearly 500 overhead twinkling lights, a 55-inch barrel-vaulted ceiling, and a champagne, gold, and emerald color palette.

A post shared by Privé Events (@priveevents) on

Hamilton Viewpoint Park

Copy Link

Hamilton Viewpoint Park is a 17-acre public park a few miles from downtown Seattle. It sits high above the main drag of Alki Avenue SW at the northernmost tip of West Seattle. From its elevated vantage point, the park offers sweeping easterly views of the Salish Sea, downtown, and the Cascade Mountains—on a nice day, that is—making it a prime locale to celebrate a new chapter of life and take incredible photos.

Westland Distillery

Copy Link

Westland Distillery came online in 2010 and has been mashing, distilling, maturing, and bottling American single-malt whiskey in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood since. Westland has come a long way rather quickly, and is now the nation’s largest single-malt whiskey distillery. From the outside Westland looks industrial and all about function, but its indoor event spaces appear inviting and comfortable. The 1,650-square-foot Cask Room, lined in casks that are stacked four high, is an especially picturesque option for both wedding ceremonies and reception dinners.

A post shared by Gretchen Stevens (@bloomedout) on

The Corson Building

Copy Link

Built in the 1920s, this historic stonemason’s cottage in Seattle’s industrial Georgetown neighborhood was originally built as a home. Today, it’s a restaurant and community centered around the experience we all share—eating. The Corson Building’s old-world vibes, lush grounds, and architectural details—including arched windows and stucco walls—make it a gorgeous option for couples looking to exchange vows. The dining room seats up to 32 guests, but expands to 80 with the help of a patio during the summer months.

Georgetown Ballroom

Copy Link

Once a warehouse garage and the historic Mission Theater, the Georgetown Ballroom is an inviting and eclectic full-service event space with room for 300 guests. The location’s charm is best reflected by its colorful, hanging lanterns, neon “Jolly Roger” signage above the stage, and exposed brick walls throughout. The venue includes many versatile spaces that can be utilized in whichever way makes the most sense for your event, including two large, adjoining rooms, two mezzanines, a stage, and a private, tree-filled outdoor courtyard.

Salish Lodge & Spa

Copy Link

Salish Lodge and Spa started out as an eight-room inn known for its country breakfasts back in 1916. Today, it’s a renowned Pacific Northwest resort perched atop Snoqualmie Falls that’s well-known for its role in the popular TV series Twin Peaks. The lodge offers a handful of indoor and outdoor venue options for wedding ceremonies and receptions, including the Centennial Green with views of Snoqualmie Falls and the surrounding river valley for up to 125 guests. A more economical package is available for smaller parties of 8 to 20 people.

A post shared by Bethany Violette (@thehamslope) on

Treehouse Point

Copy Link

If there’s a woodland fairytale-themed wedding in your future, check out Treehouse Point—a collection of bucolic treehouses set among towering evergreens, suspended above a blanket of ferns, and alongside the Raging River. Weddings at Treehouse Point include exclusive use of the property’s four-acre forest for up to 22 hours and comes with overnight lodging for up to 18 people. Ask about the elopement package if you’re thinking about a smaller, more intimate gathering.

Alderbrook Resort & Spa

Copy Link

The Hood Canal’s calm, cool waters, a luxe on-site spa, and its staff’s reputation as “tension tamers” make a wedding at Alderbrook Resort and Spa in Union, Washington sound downright relaxing. This fjord-side wedding venue gives couples options, including a formal ceremony on its terrace to a beachfront shindig with the Olympic Range in clear view. The Hood Canal is where you go for fresh bivalves and seafood of all stripes. For example, both Hama Hama Oyster Company and Taylor Shellfish Farms are nearby. Conveniently, this hyper-local bounty can be built into your wedding-day menu.

A post shared by KARISSA ROE (@karissaroe) on

Point Defiance Pagoda

Copy Link

The Pagoda, a prominent feature in Point Defiance’s Japanese Garden, was built in 1914 as a streetcar station. It sits alongside peaceful pools, a waterfall, a footbridge, sakura trees, and several gifts—a Shinto shrine and Torii Gate—presented by Tacoma’s sister city of Kitakyushu, Japan. Inside, the Pagoda’s main space is bright and airy with tall ceilings and wall-to-wall windows. Renovated in 2011, the Pagoda offers plenty of versatility—especially on those notorious Pacific Northwest days that osculate between sunshine and rain showers. The park’s rose garden is another great option at Point Defiance.

Historic 1625 Tacoma Place

Copy Link

Minutes from Tacoma’s museum district, the Historic 1625 was constructed in the 1940s as a Dodge truck dealership. Over the years, different car dealerships occupied the space—most recently Osborne McCann Cadillac until 2005. Nowadays it’s a showroom and event space, and a strong South Sound wedding venue contender. The warm, comfortable-looking space includes room for 300 guests and boasts wood-vaulted ceilings, adjustable lighting to suit the mood, and plenty of exposed brick. No corkage fees here, either.

A post shared by Historic 1625 (@historic1625) on

Thornewood Castle Bed and Breakfast

Copy Link

In 1907, Thornewood Castle was erected in Lakewood to the specifications of Chester Thorne, one of the Port of Tacoma’s founders, for his wife. Using the dismantled components of a 15th century Elizabethan manor from England, this sprawling estate—with 27,000 square feet of living space and 54 rooms—is one of few genuine private castles in the U.S. Situated next to a lake, this centuries-old Tudor Gothic-style mansion offers indoor, outdoor, and waterfront ceremonies and receptions.

The Wayfarer

With an abundance of excellent options, couples hoping to get married on Whidbey Island are spoilt for choice; places like the Historic Crockett Barn, Dancing Fish Vineyards, and Jenne Farm. But Wayfarer Farm’s five acres in the historic Bayview area seem prime for a laidback garden wedding. With mature trees, open, grassy spaces, and a long, community-style reception table under a green canopy, weddings at the Wayfarer look like a backyard party, with low-pressure and convivial moods all around.

Dairyland

Woodland Meadow Farms’ Dairyland event space is an hour north of Seattle, in Snohomish—the “Northwest’s antique capital.” The former dairy farm’s centerpiece is its rustic, restored barn featuring whitewashed shiplap walls and a tall, exposed-beam ceiling. Dairyland allows outside catering and alcohol, offers longer-than-usual rental periods, and all its rentals include tables, chairs, parking, and a one-hour rehearsal. Surrounded by farms (and a brewery), the property teems with fruits and hops depending on the time of year.

Red Cedar Farm

The centerpiece of this working farm is a renovated, century-old barn. Its interior is covered in exposed, light-colored wood, concrete floors, and thoughtful details—like a collectible Coca-Cola advertising signs and an old gas pump—that reinforce the barn’s country vibe. The indoor space flows onto a back patio, which sits underneath the warm glow of string lights. Lush plantings cover much of the venue’s 35 acres, but Red Cedar Farm is also home to a brood of animals, including pigs, donkeys, horses, and goats.

Woodinville Lavender

Nestled in the Sammamish River Valley, Woodinville Lavender’s purple-tinged gardens make for an attractive backdrop unique to the region. A one-stop-shop, rentals at Woodinville Lavender include their Valley View Room, Farm Terrace Patio, a bride’s quarters, greenhouse, and lawn. Just 30 minutes from Seattle in Woodinville wine country, this elegant wedding and reception venue can host 50 people indoors and under its covered spaces or 80 for an outdoor gathering. Keep in mind that lavender typically blooms from June through August.

The MV Skansonia

From 1929 to 1967 the MV Skansonia ferried passengers between Tacoma’s Point Defiance and Gig Harbor. Now in retirement, the ferryboat is permanently docked on the north shore of Seattle’s Lake Union, just east of the Ship Canal Bridge. Bedecked in vintage nautical garb—including ring buoys and ship’s wheels—and featuring city, water, and Space Needle views, the MV Skansonia has been a one-of-a-kind PNW wedding venue for more than 35 years.

Fremont Foundry

Opened in 1981 as an artist’s hub, the building that houses The Foundry has played an important part in making funky Fremont what it is. Before Seattle’s beloved Jimi Hendrix statue graced the corner of Broadway and East Pine Street, it was created by artist Daryl Smith in the Foundry’s space in 1997. It’s also where Fremont’s controversial Vladimir Lenin statue was reconstructed after being brought over from Slovakia in 1989. As a wedding venue, The Foundry offers an industrial alternative to the popular shabby chic, barn-style wedding style. The building’s rooftop terrace offers views of the neighborhood and the Aurora Bridge.

Parsons Gardens

A six-minute walk from Queen Anne’s Kerry Park—a popular destination boasting iconic, Frasier-level views of downtown and Mount Rainier—it’s incredible how removed Parsons Garden feels from the bustle. Formerly the family garden of Seattle businessman and philanthropist Reginald Parsons, the garden was donated to the City of Seattle in 1956. This hidden, corner-lot gem is concealed from passersby by towering foliage. The park itself is covered in flowering plants and trees, and its open, grassy lawn is suitable for small ceremonies.

The Center for Wooden Boats

The Center for Wooden Boats is one of Seattle’s most beloved maritime heritage organizations—a hands-on museum meant to preserve long-standing traditions and skills and where the exhibits themselves are in the water. The rentable space—which is suited for weddings on the smaller side—sits among the center’s collection of vessels, with a marina to the east, the Space Needle and Naval Reserve Building to the west, and Lake Union and its seaplanes and kayaks to the north.

King County Courthouse

Sure, the wedding-related verbiage on King County’s website isn’t as flowery as it is on other wedding venue websites. Big deal! A courthouse wedding can mean less stress, a shorter engagement, the ability to focus on just the important details, and not starting your married lives on a mountain of wedding-related debt. Note that fees vary by judge and weddings can be performed before 8:30 a.m., after 4:30 p.m., or on weekends and holidays by appointment only.

Shotgun Ceremonies

Do the dang thing in a jiffy at Shotgun Ceremonies in Pioneer Square, a Vegas-style wedding chapel that specializes in kitsch-forward ceremonies. The chapel can accommodate parties of two to 30, and offsite ceremonies are an option, too. Wedding packages range from $299 to $349 and come with an officiant, an interactive, individualized ceremony, and marriage license paperwork (they’ll even file it for you). Add Elvis for $150. If the average cost of getting hitched has you all shook up, this might be the place for you.

The Great Hall at Union Station

The Great Hall at Union Station exudes history ($), grandeur ($$), and opulence ($$$). Dating back to 1910—just 40 years after Seattle was incorporated—the station was built to serve the Union Pacific Railroad and the Milwaukee Road. Union Station facilitated the movement of travelers until passenger service was discontinued in 1971. Today, the station’s Great Hall is an 11,000-square-foot, Beaux-Arts-style event space, complete with nearly 500 overhead twinkling lights, a 55-inch barrel-vaulted ceiling, and a champagne, gold, and emerald color palette.

A post shared by Privé Events (@priveevents) on

Hamilton Viewpoint Park

Hamilton Viewpoint Park is a 17-acre public park a few miles from downtown Seattle. It sits high above the main drag of Alki Avenue SW at the northernmost tip of West Seattle. From its elevated vantage point, the park offers sweeping easterly views of the Salish Sea, downtown, and the Cascade Mountains—on a nice day, that is—making it a prime locale to celebrate a new chapter of life and take incredible photos.

Westland Distillery

Westland Distillery came online in 2010 and has been mashing, distilling, maturing, and bottling American single-malt whiskey in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood since. Westland has come a long way rather quickly, and is now the nation’s largest single-malt whiskey distillery. From the outside Westland looks industrial and all about function, but its indoor event spaces appear inviting and comfortable. The 1,650-square-foot Cask Room, lined in casks that are stacked four high, is an especially picturesque option for both wedding ceremonies and reception dinners.

A post shared by Gretchen Stevens (@bloomedout) on

The Corson Building

Built in the 1920s, this historic stonemason’s cottage in Seattle’s industrial Georgetown neighborhood was originally built as a home. Today, it’s a restaurant and community centered around the experience we all share—eating. The Corson Building’s old-world vibes, lush grounds, and architectural details—including arched windows and stucco walls—make it a gorgeous option for couples looking to exchange vows. The dining room seats up to 32 guests, but expands to 80 with the help of a patio during the summer months.

Georgetown Ballroom

Once a warehouse garage and the historic Mission Theater, the Georgetown Ballroom is an inviting and eclectic full-service event space with room for 300 guests. The location’s charm is best reflected by its colorful, hanging lanterns, neon “Jolly Roger” signage above the stage, and exposed brick walls throughout. The venue includes many versatile spaces that can be utilized in whichever way makes the most sense for your event, including two large, adjoining rooms, two mezzanines, a stage, and a private, tree-filled outdoor courtyard.

Salish Lodge & Spa

Salish Lodge and Spa started out as an eight-room inn known for its country breakfasts back in 1916. Today, it’s a renowned Pacific Northwest resort perched atop Snoqualmie Falls that’s well-known for its role in the popular TV series Twin Peaks. The lodge offers a handful of indoor and outdoor venue options for wedding ceremonies and receptions, including the Centennial Green with views of Snoqualmie Falls and the surrounding river valley for up to 125 guests. A more economical package is available for smaller parties of 8 to 20 people.

A post shared by Bethany Violette (@thehamslope) on

Treehouse Point

If there’s a woodland fairytale-themed wedding in your future, check out Treehouse Point—a collection of bucolic treehouses set among towering evergreens, suspended above a blanket of ferns, and alongside the Raging River. Weddings at Treehouse Point include exclusive use of the property’s four-acre forest for up to 22 hours and comes with overnight lodging for up to 18 people. Ask about the elopement package if you’re thinking about a smaller, more intimate gathering.

Alderbrook Resort & Spa

The Hood Canal’s calm, cool waters, a luxe on-site spa, and its staff’s reputation as “tension tamers” make a wedding at Alderbrook Resort and Spa in Union, Washington sound downright relaxing. This fjord-side wedding venue gives couples options, including a formal ceremony on its terrace to a beachfront shindig with the Olympic Range in clear view. The Hood Canal is where you go for fresh bivalves and seafood of all stripes. For example, both Hama Hama Oyster Company and Taylor Shellfish Farms are nearby. Conveniently, this hyper-local bounty can be built into your wedding-day menu.

A post shared by KARISSA ROE (@karissaroe) on

Point Defiance Pagoda

The Pagoda, a prominent feature in Point Defiance’s Japanese Garden, was built in 1914 as a streetcar station. It sits alongside peaceful pools, a waterfall, a footbridge, sakura trees, and several gifts—a Shinto shrine and Torii Gate—presented by Tacoma’s sister city of Kitakyushu, Japan. Inside, the Pagoda’s main space is bright and airy with tall ceilings and wall-to-wall windows. Renovated in 2011, the Pagoda offers plenty of versatility—especially on those notorious Pacific Northwest days that osculate between sunshine and rain showers. The park’s rose garden is another great option at Point Defiance.

Historic 1625 Tacoma Place

Minutes from Tacoma’s museum district, the Historic 1625 was constructed in the 1940s as a Dodge truck dealership. Over the years, different car dealerships occupied the space—most recently Osborne McCann Cadillac until 2005. Nowadays it’s a showroom and event space, and a strong South Sound wedding venue contender. The warm, comfortable-looking space includes room for 300 guests and boasts wood-vaulted ceilings, adjustable lighting to suit the mood, and plenty of exposed brick. No corkage fees here, either.

A post shared by Historic 1625 (@historic1625) on

Thornewood Castle Bed and Breakfast

In 1907, Thornewood Castle was erected in Lakewood to the specifications of Chester Thorne, one of the Port of Tacoma’s founders, for his wife. Using the dismantled components of a 15th century Elizabethan manor from England, this sprawling estate—with 27,000 square feet of living space and 54 rooms—is one of few genuine private castles in the U.S. Situated next to a lake, this centuries-old Tudor Gothic-style mansion offers indoor, outdoor, and waterfront ceremonies and receptions.