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A path in Kobe Terrace Park in Seattle. There are plants and trees with multicolor blossoms on both sides of the path.
Kobe Terrace Park.
Shelly Smith/Courtesy of the Seattle Municipal Archives, item No. 179866

15 secret Seattle parks to seek out

Explore the nooks and crannies of Seattle

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Kobe Terrace Park.
| Photo by Shelly Smith/Courtesy of the Seattle Municipal Archives, item No. 179866

Seattle has more than 400 parks, spread across more than 6,200 acres land, but just a handful of them get regular recognition. Cal Anderson Park is a busy weekend sunning spot, for example, and Discovery Park is full of hikers (and really hard to miss). But so many other parks are out there waiting to be explored.

Seattle is filled with the undiscovered, or only slightly-discovered, and the nice weather is beckoning to you to find them for yourself. Maybe one is already your go-to park, in which case: Sorry for letting word get out.

We've mapped out 15 tiny or hidden parks that often fly under the radar, ordered from north to south. Some of them are beaches, others offer amazing views. All of them are worth the trip.

Gotta stick close to downtown? We’ve got that covered.

Looking for a hike? Our map of transit-accessible hikes includes many Seattle parks.

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1. Rainbow Point

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NE 75th St. & Banner Way NE
Seattle, WA

Enjoy a great view of downtown and the Olympic Mountains while also sitting on benches or making your way along the simple pathway. This park is lit and features trees and shrubs along with plant beds and small lawns.

2. Belvoir Place

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3659 42nd Ave. NE
Seattle, WA

This small waterfront park, located at 42nd Avenue Northeast, is near Surber Drive Northeast in Laurelhurst. While the dock is in need of some serious repair, it's a cool little gem of a spot for sunbathing or even getting in the water if you're up for it.

3. Thomas C. Wales Park

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2401 6th Ave. N
Seattle, WA

This place was used as a gravel pit and for material storage prior to being developed into a neighborhood park. Some of that gravel has become public art and gives this tiny park a unique look and feel.

4. Terry Pettus Park

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2001 Fairview Ave E
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 684-4075
Visit Website

This Eastlake pocket park was named after Terry Pettus, who led the charge for preserving Seattle’s houseboats. It’s right along Lake Union, nestled among the houseboat and floating home communities there. Appropriately, it’s one of the best points for viewing some floating homes from land. Descend the staircase down to a little boardwalk with built-in benches, and walk out on the dock for a better look at the lake—or to launch a kayak or paddleboard. If you do decide to swim (you do you), you can thank Pettus for preventing the city from dumping sewage directly into the lake.

5. 32nd Avenue West Beach

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32nd Ave W
Seattle, WA

Go to the end of 32nd Avenue West and you'll find a small waterfront beach that's a perfect jumping off point for a boat ride or just to sit and enjoy views of Downtown Seattle and Bainbridge Island.

6. Ursula Judkins Viewpoint

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2605 W Galer St
Seattle, WA 98199
(206) 684-4075
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Just off the Magnolia Bridge, this little pocket of park offers views of Smith Cove and the downtown skyline. As parks go, it’s relatively new—the city purchased the land from the Navy in 2003. It’s named for neighborhood activist Ursula Judkins, who died in 2000. (No relation to Judkins Park, which was named after 19th-century real estate mogul Norman B. Judkins.)

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7. Bellevue Place

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Bellevue Pl. E and Bellevue Ave. E
Seattle, WA
(206) 684-4075
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Bellevue Place is small grassy slope overlooking Lake Union across I-5. A short bike path runs through along bottom of the hill, connecting Melrose Ave E to a bridge over the highway to Eastlake Avenue. Great views here of downtown Seattle, Queen Anne Hill and the Olympic Mountains.

8. Tashkent Park

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521 Boylston Ave. E
Seattle, WA
(206) 684-4075
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This little park bisects an apartment-filled block in Capitol Hill. In the middle of the day it has some sunny spots, but it’s best for relaxing in the shade, with both a decently-sized lawn and a wide selection of seating options.

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9. Kobe Terrace

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650 S Main St
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 684-4075
Visit Website

Hing Hay Park is, rightfully, a big crowd pleaser in the International District—especially with its recent renovations. But it’d be a shame to overlook Kobe Terrace in the process. Built into a hillside, the park has a community garden below and paths with Mount Rainier views winding up by the freeway above. The cherry trees and stone lantern adorning the park were a gift from Seattle sister city Kobe, Japan.

10. Andover Place

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4000 Beach Dr. SW
Seattle, WA

Andover Place is simply a narrow grassy slope between buildings, providing public access to the beach. Tree trunks washed up on the beach make excellent spots to sit and enjoy the view. It's a good spot to explore the beach, especially at low tide.

11. Dakota Place Park

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4304 SW Dakota St
Seattle, WA 98116
(206) 684-4075
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This little tucked-away park is right off California Avenue, just a couple of blocks from the Junction, but it can be easy to miss. You might’ve been there for a wedding, though, since the historic building on the property, an old substation, is often used as a venue. But the little park itself is an adorable little getaway with a patio, benches, and a grassy field. Perhaps bring a picnic from the West Seattle Farmers Market here on a nice day.

12. Herring's House Park/Tualtwx

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4540 West Marginal Way
Seattle, WA
(206) 684-4075
Visit Website

This very neat little park in the Duwamish industrial area offers some respite against the hustle and bustle of trucks and trains nearby. There are walking trails here that provide views of the Duwamish River, and some interpretive signs to help inform visitors about the local ecosystem.

13. Cove Park

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Not to be confused with Smith Cove Park, this new-ish waterfront park is next to the Fauntleroy Ferry Dock, reopened in 2015 after being closed for a while for Barton Pump Station upgrades. You can follow the top of the station down to the waterfront beach with salmon art leading the way. Be wary of the shore during low tide, as it can be a little dangerous—but there's lots of space to explore or just sit and watch the ferries.

14. Chinook Beach Park

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Rainier Ave. S & Ithaca Pl. S
Seattle, WA

Chinook Beach Park features a small beach area complete with driftwood and logs that have washed up along the shore. There is also a simple, long walking path along the beach, which offers spectacular views of Lake Washington and the Cascades beyond. A small concrete landing provides a good platform for a picnic or camera tripod, as well as an interpretive sign that gives some background information on the area.

15. Brace Point

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A third of a mile south of the Fauntleroy Ferry Dock, look for a “shore view” sign and that's where you’ll find the public access spot. This secluded beach offers fantastic views of Vashon and Blake Islands. Bring a lunch and just hang out for a while, watching the ferries go by. Just don't go too far north, as it becomes private property quickly.

1. Rainbow Point

NE 75th St. & Banner Way NE, Seattle, WA

Enjoy a great view of downtown and the Olympic Mountains while also sitting on benches or making your way along the simple pathway. This park is lit and features trees and shrubs along with plant beds and small lawns.

NE 75th St. & Banner Way NE
Seattle, WA

2. Belvoir Place

3659 42nd Ave. NE, Seattle, WA

This small waterfront park, located at 42nd Avenue Northeast, is near Surber Drive Northeast in Laurelhurst. While the dock is in need of some serious repair, it's a cool little gem of a spot for sunbathing or even getting in the water if you're up for it.

3659 42nd Ave. NE
Seattle, WA

3. Thomas C. Wales Park

2401 6th Ave. N, Seattle, WA

This place was used as a gravel pit and for material storage prior to being developed into a neighborhood park. Some of that gravel has become public art and gives this tiny park a unique look and feel.

2401 6th Ave. N
Seattle, WA

4. Terry Pettus Park

2001 Fairview Ave E, Seattle, WA 98102

This Eastlake pocket park was named after Terry Pettus, who led the charge for preserving Seattle’s houseboats. It’s right along Lake Union, nestled among the houseboat and floating home communities there. Appropriately, it’s one of the best points for viewing some floating homes from land. Descend the staircase down to a little boardwalk with built-in benches, and walk out on the dock for a better look at the lake—or to launch a kayak or paddleboard. If you do decide to swim (you do you), you can thank Pettus for preventing the city from dumping sewage directly into the lake.

2001 Fairview Ave E
Seattle, WA 98102

5. 32nd Avenue West Beach

32nd Ave W, Seattle, WA

Go to the end of 32nd Avenue West and you'll find a small waterfront beach that's a perfect jumping off point for a boat ride or just to sit and enjoy views of Downtown Seattle and Bainbridge Island.

32nd Ave W
Seattle, WA

6. Ursula Judkins Viewpoint

2605 W Galer St, Seattle, WA 98199

Just off the Magnolia Bridge, this little pocket of park offers views of Smith Cove and the downtown skyline. As parks go, it’s relatively new—the city purchased the land from the Navy in 2003. It’s named for neighborhood activist Ursula Judkins, who died in 2000. (No relation to Judkins Park, which was named after 19th-century real estate mogul Norman B. Judkins.)

2605 W Galer St
Seattle, WA 98199

7. Bellevue Place

Bellevue Pl. E and Bellevue Ave. E, Seattle, WA

Bellevue Place is small grassy slope overlooking Lake Union across I-5. A short bike path runs through along bottom of the hill, connecting Melrose Ave E to a bridge over the highway to Eastlake Avenue. Great views here of downtown Seattle, Queen Anne Hill and the Olympic Mountains.

Bellevue Pl. E and Bellevue Ave. E
Seattle, WA

8. Tashkent Park

521 Boylston Ave. E, Seattle, WA

This little park bisects an apartment-filled block in Capitol Hill. In the middle of the day it has some sunny spots, but it’s best for relaxing in the shade, with both a decently-sized lawn and a wide selection of seating options.

521 Boylston Ave. E
Seattle, WA

9. Kobe Terrace

650 S Main St, Seattle, WA 98104

Hing Hay Park is, rightfully, a big crowd pleaser in the International District—especially with its recent renovations. But it’d be a shame to overlook Kobe Terrace in the process. Built into a hillside, the park has a community garden below and paths with Mount Rainier views winding up by the freeway above. The cherry trees and stone lantern adorning the park were a gift from Seattle sister city Kobe, Japan.

650 S Main St
Seattle, WA 98104

10. Andover Place

4000 Beach Dr. SW, Seattle, WA

Andover Place is simply a narrow grassy slope between buildings, providing public access to the beach. Tree trunks washed up on the beach make excellent spots to sit and enjoy the view. It's a good spot to explore the beach, especially at low tide.

4000 Beach Dr. SW
Seattle, WA

11. Dakota Place Park

4304 SW Dakota St, Seattle, WA 98116

This little tucked-away park is right off California Avenue, just a couple of blocks from the Junction, but it can be easy to miss. You might’ve been there for a wedding, though, since the historic building on the property, an old substation, is often used as a venue. But the little park itself is an adorable little getaway with a patio, benches, and a grassy field. Perhaps bring a picnic from the West Seattle Farmers Market here on a nice day.

4304 SW Dakota St
Seattle, WA 98116

12. Herring's House Park/Tualtwx

4540 West Marginal Way, Seattle, WA

This very neat little park in the Duwamish industrial area offers some respite against the hustle and bustle of trucks and trains nearby. There are walking trails here that provide views of the Duwamish River, and some interpretive signs to help inform visitors about the local ecosystem.

4540 West Marginal Way
Seattle, WA

13. Cove Park

Seattle, WA

Not to be confused with Smith Cove Park, this new-ish waterfront park is next to the Fauntleroy Ferry Dock, reopened in 2015 after being closed for a while for Barton Pump Station upgrades. You can follow the top of the station down to the waterfront beach with salmon art leading the way. Be wary of the shore during low tide, as it can be a little dangerous—but there's lots of space to explore or just sit and watch the ferries.

14. Chinook Beach Park

Rainier Ave. S & Ithaca Pl. S, Seattle, WA

Chinook Beach Park features a small beach area complete with driftwood and logs that have washed up along the shore. There is also a simple, long walking path along the beach, which offers spectacular views of Lake Washington and the Cascades beyond. A small concrete landing provides a good platform for a picnic or camera tripod, as well as an interpretive sign that gives some background information on the area.

Rainier Ave. S & Ithaca Pl. S
Seattle, WA

15. Brace Point

Seattle, WA

A third of a mile south of the Fauntleroy Ferry Dock, look for a “shore view” sign and that's where you’ll find the public access spot. This secluded beach offers fantastic views of Vashon and Blake Islands. Bring a lunch and just hang out for a while, watching the ferries go by. Just don't go too far north, as it becomes private property quickly.

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