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Mapping 15 of the Tiniest Parks Tucked Around Seattle

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Image: Sage Ross

When we started thinking about the tiniest parks around Seattle, parklets came to mind. But since we've already identified and mapped them, we figured we should try to shed some light on the tiny parks strewn around town that haven't gotten their due. Mostly because you might walk past some of them every day and not even realize they're city parks. As tiny as 0,004 acres (185 sq. ft.) these parks take advantage of the small spaces they've been afforded to provide a touch of green (or at least a place to park your butt) where there might not have been otherwise. You might question why some of them have park status but you can't argue that they're welcome in town (unless, say, you're Jason Rantz).

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1. Lakeview Place (0.004 acres)

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1042 Lakeview Blvd. E
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 684-4075
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This 185-square-foot park is officially considered by the city parks department as the smallest park in Seattle. There's not really any room to do anything here other than look at it. So, look at it. Photo: Sage Ross

2. Boylston Place (0.005 acres)

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Broadway & Boylston Ave. E
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 684-4075
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The name for Boylston Place was taken from an adjacent street which was named by Arthur Denny. The property was deeded to the city in 1902 by Mary Denny on the condition that it be beautified as a park, monument or fountain. It's so unassuming, most folks who pass by don't even realize it's a city park. Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

3. Hyde Place (0.01 acres)

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E Madison St. & E Galer St.
Seattle, WA 98112

Deeded to the City in 1911 by Maude & Oliver McGilvra, it was named to honor D.N. Hyde, member of the first City Council 1870. A tiny park you can get a great view from.

4. Lake City Memorial Triangle (0.01 acres)

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31st Ave. NE & Lake City Way
Seattle, WA 98125
(206) 684-4075
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This tiny triangle at the corner of 31st Ave. N.E. and Lake City Way is easy to miss. As for what it's a memorial to, well, you'll have to tell us.

5. Lynn Street Mini Park (0.01 acres)

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E Lynn St. & Fairview Ave. E
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 684-4075
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6. McGraw Square (0.01 acres)

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Stewart St. & Westlake Ave. N
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 684-4075
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McGraw Square was acquired by the City in 1911 “for a public square” and designated as a Landmark in 1985. Since 2011, it has been managed and maintained by Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT). McGraw Square is named for John H. McGraw (1850-1910), who came to Seattle in 1876 and became City Marshall, Chief of Police, Sheriff of King County and eventually second Governor of the State of Washington.

7. Rainier Place (0.01 acres)

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2nd Avenue Northwest & Northwest 53rd Street
Seattle, WA 98107

Jurisdiction for the park was transferred to the City in 1909. It was created by the widening of Ballard Place, 56th and 57th in 1909 and extended through Greenwood Park (Ballard Park) from 2nd to W. 55th. The lone, large pine tree is the only demarcation that tells you this is a park. Otherwise, you might not ever know. Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

8. Sierra Place (0.01 acres)

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S Horton St. & Sierra Dr.
Seattle, WA 98144

You can get some nice Lake Washington views from this tiny park, which is also connected to Landing Parkway, another small space. Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

9. Tilikum Place (0.01 acres)

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5th Ave. & Denny Way
Seattle, WA 98121
(206) 684-4075
Visit Website

Tilikum Place itself (the name meaning "welcome" or "greetings" in Chinook jargon) is located at the juncture of the original land claims of Denny, Boren, and Bell. The statue, sculpted by James Wehn from the only existing photo of the chief, was unveiled on Founders' Day, November 13, 1912, by Chief Seattle's great-great-granddaughter. Artist James Wehn also designed the seal for the City of Seattle, which includes a profile of Chief Seattle, and cast the concrete sculptures on the south-east portal of the I-90/Mount Baker Tunnel.

10. Westlake Square (0.01 acres)

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1900 Westlake Ave.
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 684-4075
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Westlake Square was once an underground Comfort Station, which was a bus stop shelter built here in 1917. It was demolished and its rooms filled in 1964, and was the last of such stations in Seattle. In 2010, Seattle Department of Transportation redeveloped Westlake Square and adjacent McGraw Square into a new plaza for the South Lake Union Streetcar.

11. Belmont Place (0.02 acres)

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Belmont Pl. E & Belmont Ave. E
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 684-4075
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Right at the triangle meeting spot of Belmont Place and Belmont Avenue. The name kinda makes itself, doesn't it?

12. Crescent Place (0.02 acres)

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N 75th St. & Orin Ct. N
Seattle, WA 98103

Only 0.02 acres bit, Crescent Place presents a bit of mystery. There's an old metal sculpture that sticks up in the middle of the park's hedge. What is it? Your guess is as good as ours... Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

13. Summit Place (0.02 acres)

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Belmont Ave. E & Bellevue Pl. E
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 684-4075
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A gorgeous, massive tree shades this triangle that looks down on Lake Union from above.

14. Laurelhurst Triangle (0.02 acres)

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46th Ave. NE & E Laurelhurst Dr. NE
Seattle, WA 98105

You might miss this park on a map but you can't miss the enormous tree right in the center of it, looming over the street. Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

15. Eastmont Place (0.03 acres)

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Eastmont Way W & Westmont Way W
Seattle, WA 98199

Measuring a scant 0.03 acres, this tiny traffic triangle is marked with neighborhood tetherball hanging from a street sign. According to the city it's considered a 10-foot public walkway. See how many steps it takes you to walk the circumference. Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

1. Lakeview Place (0.004 acres)

1042 Lakeview Blvd. E, Seattle, WA 98102

This 185-square-foot park is officially considered by the city parks department as the smallest park in Seattle. There's not really any room to do anything here other than look at it. So, look at it. Photo: Sage Ross

1042 Lakeview Blvd. E
Seattle, WA 98102

2. Boylston Place (0.005 acres)

Broadway & Boylston Ave. E, Seattle, WA 98102

The name for Boylston Place was taken from an adjacent street which was named by Arthur Denny. The property was deeded to the city in 1902 by Mary Denny on the condition that it be beautified as a park, monument or fountain. It's so unassuming, most folks who pass by don't even realize it's a city park. Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

Broadway & Boylston Ave. E
Seattle, WA 98102

3. Hyde Place (0.01 acres)

E Madison St. & E Galer St., Seattle, WA 98112

Deeded to the City in 1911 by Maude & Oliver McGilvra, it was named to honor D.N. Hyde, member of the first City Council 1870. A tiny park you can get a great view from.

E Madison St. & E Galer St.
Seattle, WA 98112

4. Lake City Memorial Triangle (0.01 acres)

31st Ave. NE & Lake City Way, Seattle, WA 98125

This tiny triangle at the corner of 31st Ave. N.E. and Lake City Way is easy to miss. As for what it's a memorial to, well, you'll have to tell us.

31st Ave. NE & Lake City Way
Seattle, WA 98125

5. Lynn Street Mini Park (0.01 acres)

E Lynn St. & Fairview Ave. E, Seattle, WA 98102

E Lynn St. & Fairview Ave. E
Seattle, WA 98102

6. McGraw Square (0.01 acres)

Stewart St. & Westlake Ave. N, Seattle, WA 98101

McGraw Square was acquired by the City in 1911 “for a public square” and designated as a Landmark in 1985. Since 2011, it has been managed and maintained by Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT). McGraw Square is named for John H. McGraw (1850-1910), who came to Seattle in 1876 and became City Marshall, Chief of Police, Sheriff of King County and eventually second Governor of the State of Washington.

Stewart St. & Westlake Ave. N
Seattle, WA 98101

7. Rainier Place (0.01 acres)

2nd Avenue Northwest & Northwest 53rd Street, Seattle, WA 98107

Jurisdiction for the park was transferred to the City in 1909. It was created by the widening of Ballard Place, 56th and 57th in 1909 and extended through Greenwood Park (Ballard Park) from 2nd to W. 55th. The lone, large pine tree is the only demarcation that tells you this is a park. Otherwise, you might not ever know. Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

2nd Avenue Northwest & Northwest 53rd Street
Seattle, WA 98107

8. Sierra Place (0.01 acres)

S Horton St. & Sierra Dr., Seattle, WA 98144

You can get some nice Lake Washington views from this tiny park, which is also connected to Landing Parkway, another small space. Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

S Horton St. & Sierra Dr.
Seattle, WA 98144

9. Tilikum Place (0.01 acres)

5th Ave. & Denny Way, Seattle, WA 98121

Tilikum Place itself (the name meaning "welcome" or "greetings" in Chinook jargon) is located at the juncture of the original land claims of Denny, Boren, and Bell. The statue, sculpted by James Wehn from the only existing photo of the chief, was unveiled on Founders' Day, November 13, 1912, by Chief Seattle's great-great-granddaughter. Artist James Wehn also designed the seal for the City of Seattle, which includes a profile of Chief Seattle, and cast the concrete sculptures on the south-east portal of the I-90/Mount Baker Tunnel.

5th Ave. & Denny Way
Seattle, WA 98121

10. Westlake Square (0.01 acres)

1900 Westlake Ave., Seattle, WA 98101

Westlake Square was once an underground Comfort Station, which was a bus stop shelter built here in 1917. It was demolished and its rooms filled in 1964, and was the last of such stations in Seattle. In 2010, Seattle Department of Transportation redeveloped Westlake Square and adjacent McGraw Square into a new plaza for the South Lake Union Streetcar.

1900 Westlake Ave.
Seattle, WA 98101

11. Belmont Place (0.02 acres)

Belmont Pl. E & Belmont Ave. E, Seattle, WA 98102

Right at the triangle meeting spot of Belmont Place and Belmont Avenue. The name kinda makes itself, doesn't it?

Belmont Pl. E & Belmont Ave. E
Seattle, WA 98102

12. Crescent Place (0.02 acres)

N 75th St. & Orin Ct. N, Seattle, WA 98103

Only 0.02 acres bit, Crescent Place presents a bit of mystery. There's an old metal sculpture that sticks up in the middle of the park's hedge. What is it? Your guess is as good as ours... Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

N 75th St. & Orin Ct. N
Seattle, WA 98103

13. Summit Place (0.02 acres)

Belmont Ave. E & Bellevue Pl. E, Seattle, WA 98102

A gorgeous, massive tree shades this triangle that looks down on Lake Union from above.

Belmont Ave. E & Bellevue Pl. E
Seattle, WA 98102

14. Laurelhurst Triangle (0.02 acres)

46th Ave. NE & E Laurelhurst Dr. NE, Seattle, WA 98105

You might miss this park on a map but you can't miss the enormous tree right in the center of it, looming over the street. Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

46th Ave. NE & E Laurelhurst Dr. NE
Seattle, WA 98105

15. Eastmont Place (0.03 acres)

Eastmont Way W & Westmont Way W, Seattle, WA 98199

Measuring a scant 0.03 acres, this tiny traffic triangle is marked with neighborhood tetherball hanging from a street sign. According to the city it's considered a 10-foot public walkway. See how many steps it takes you to walk the circumference. Photo: Year of Seattle Parks

Eastmont Way W & Westmont Way W
Seattle, WA 98199