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Mapping The Public Art That Makes Fremont So Quirky

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[Photo courtesy of Jason Brackins]

Have you ever walked around Fremont and noticed it's disproportionately-large amount of quirky statues and public art? Ever-growing, mapping every single art piece or quirky architectural feature in Fremont would be nearly impossible. However, we thought we'd give you map of some of Fremont's larger public art pieces - some of which you may have never heard of before. From dinosaurs & planets to Rapunzel & a Rocket, the next time you find yourself in Fremont, take the time to look a little closer and discover the neighborhoods quirky intricacies.


Written by Alyssa Campbell
· "Where to find the best public art in Seattle" [Curbed]
· All Curbed coverage of Fremont

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1. Lenin's Statue

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3526 Fremont Pl N, Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

This bronze depiction of Vladimir Lenin was created by Slavic sculptor Emil Venkov. Originally put on display in Poprad, Slovakia in 1988, the statue weights seven tons and took ten years to finish. With an intentional depiction of Lenin as a 'violent revolutionary' instead of a benevolent leader, the statue was brought over to Seattle by the American Lewis Carpenter, who found it lying on the ground after it was nearly destroyed in a 1989 revolution. Determined to bring the statue back to the United States, Carpenter refinanced his house in order to ship it over. The statue is on display for sale to passersby, if anyone ever dares to make an offer.

2. Rapunzel

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Fremont Bridge, Seattle
Washington 98109, États-Unis

While crossing over the Fremont bridge, look out for a neon sculpture of Rapunzel locked into a tower with her neon hair running down the side. It was created by local Fremont glass artist Rodman Miller.
[Photo courtesy of Paul Swortz]

3. The Center Of The Universe

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3401 Fremont Pl. N, Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

One late night in 1991, a group of Scientists in Fremont decided after a few beers that the Center of the Universe was located as the intersection of Fremont Ave and N 35th Street. As a result, this signpost was constructed and has marked the 'center' of the universe ever since.

4. Fremont Dinosaurs

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Stop by and see ivy growing into the shape of two apatosauruses. The two dinosaurs were originally from the Pacific Science Center which wanted to get ride of them. They were bought for $1 by a local and transported to Fremont. 66-feet long, the Fremont dinosaurs now even have plumbing and electricity.

5. The Fremont Troll

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Fremont Way N, Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

Built in 1989, the Fremont Troll was conceived as a way to revitalize the area under the Aurora Bridge, which had fallen derelict to the use of drug dealers. It took 7 weeks to build. The troll has quickly become one of Seattle's most quirky tourist attractions, with the street right in front of it even being renamed Troll Avenue in 2005. The statue depicts a large troll holding tightly onto a real Volkswagen Beetle and is made from steel rebar, concrete and wire. It was designed by four local artists.
[Photo courtesy of Jamie Campbell]

6. Waiting For The Interurban

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N 34th Street, Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

Built in 1979 by the sculptor Richard Beyer, the Interurban sculpture depicts five people and a dog waiting for Seattle's old Interurban rail line that used to run through Fremont, and which, of course, will never arrive. The statue is available to the public to decorate, which has been used over the years to celebrate birthdays, weddings and many other events.

7. Fremont Rocket

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601 N 35th St, Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

Originally built upon AJ's Surplus in Belltown, the Rocket was salvaged by the Fremont Business Association in order to create a new "unique landmark monument." It took more than three years and several specialists, but in 1994 the Fremont Rocket finally found its place on the corner of Evanston and N 36th St. Fremont's motto, 'de Libertas Quirkas' or 'Freedom to be Peculiar' is written upon it.

8. The Saturn

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To mirror the rocket, a Saturn was placed on top of the building located just across the street in 2013 at a cost of $25,000.

9. Planet orbs

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600 North 36th Street, Seattle
Washington 98103, États-Unis

Fitting in with the rocket and the Saturn found just across the block, three large planet orbs can be found outside of the neighborhood Fedex.

10. J.P. Patches Statue

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N. 34th St., Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

In 2008 a bronze statue of the famous Washington clown J.P. Patches (aka Chris Wedes) was built, alongside his sidekick Gertrude. J.P. Patches was the clown-host of a Western Washington children's TV show that ran from 1958-1981. The statue now serves in his memory, after his death in 2012.
[Photo courtesy of Phil Dougherty]

1. Lenin's Statue

3526 Fremont Pl N, Seattle, WA 98103, États-Unis

This bronze depiction of Vladimir Lenin was created by Slavic sculptor Emil Venkov. Originally put on display in Poprad, Slovakia in 1988, the statue weights seven tons and took ten years to finish. With an intentional depiction of Lenin as a 'violent revolutionary' instead of a benevolent leader, the statue was brought over to Seattle by the American Lewis Carpenter, who found it lying on the ground after it was nearly destroyed in a 1989 revolution. Determined to bring the statue back to the United States, Carpenter refinanced his house in order to ship it over. The statue is on display for sale to passersby, if anyone ever dares to make an offer.

3526 Fremont Pl N, Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

2. Rapunzel

Fremont Bridge, Seattle, Washington 98109, États-Unis

While crossing over the Fremont bridge, look out for a neon sculpture of Rapunzel locked into a tower with her neon hair running down the side. It was created by local Fremont glass artist Rodman Miller.
[Photo courtesy of Paul Swortz]

Fremont Bridge, Seattle
Washington 98109, États-Unis

3. The Center Of The Universe

3401 Fremont Pl. N, Seattle, WA 98103, États-Unis

One late night in 1991, a group of Scientists in Fremont decided after a few beers that the Center of the Universe was located as the intersection of Fremont Ave and N 35th Street. As a result, this signpost was constructed and has marked the 'center' of the universe ever since.

3401 Fremont Pl. N, Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

4. Fremont Dinosaurs

N 34th Street and Phinney Ave, Seattle

Stop by and see ivy growing into the shape of two apatosauruses. The two dinosaurs were originally from the Pacific Science Center which wanted to get ride of them. They were bought for $1 by a local and transported to Fremont. 66-feet long, the Fremont dinosaurs now even have plumbing and electricity.

5. The Fremont Troll

Fremont Way N, Seattle, WA 98103, États-Unis

Built in 1989, the Fremont Troll was conceived as a way to revitalize the area under the Aurora Bridge, which had fallen derelict to the use of drug dealers. It took 7 weeks to build. The troll has quickly become one of Seattle's most quirky tourist attractions, with the street right in front of it even being renamed Troll Avenue in 2005. The statue depicts a large troll holding tightly onto a real Volkswagen Beetle and is made from steel rebar, concrete and wire. It was designed by four local artists.
[Photo courtesy of Jamie Campbell]

Fremont Way N, Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

6. Waiting For The Interurban

N 34th Street, Seattle, WA 98103, États-Unis

Built in 1979 by the sculptor Richard Beyer, the Interurban sculpture depicts five people and a dog waiting for Seattle's old Interurban rail line that used to run through Fremont, and which, of course, will never arrive. The statue is available to the public to decorate, which has been used over the years to celebrate birthdays, weddings and many other events.

N 34th Street, Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

7. Fremont Rocket

601 N 35th St, Seattle, WA 98103, États-Unis

Originally built upon AJ's Surplus in Belltown, the Rocket was salvaged by the Fremont Business Association in order to create a new "unique landmark monument." It took more than three years and several specialists, but in 1994 the Fremont Rocket finally found its place on the corner of Evanston and N 36th St. Fremont's motto, 'de Libertas Quirkas' or 'Freedom to be Peculiar' is written upon it.

601 N 35th St, Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis

8. The Saturn

3417 Evanston Ave N

To mirror the rocket, a Saturn was placed on top of the building located just across the street in 2013 at a cost of $25,000.

9. Planet orbs

600 North 36th Street, Seattle, Washington 98103, États-Unis

Fitting in with the rocket and the Saturn found just across the block, three large planet orbs can be found outside of the neighborhood Fedex.

600 North 36th Street, Seattle
Washington 98103, États-Unis

10. J.P. Patches Statue

N. 34th St., Seattle, WA 98103, États-Unis

In 2008 a bronze statue of the famous Washington clown J.P. Patches (aka Chris Wedes) was built, alongside his sidekick Gertrude. J.P. Patches was the clown-host of a Western Washington children's TV show that ran from 1958-1981. The statue now serves in his memory, after his death in 2012.
[Photo courtesy of Phil Dougherty]

N. 34th St., Seattle
WA 98103, États-Unis