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Stone figures stand beneath an iron-and-glass shelter that looks like a bus stop. There’s a street and a brick building in the background.
Courtesy of Seattle Municipal Archives, item No. 177840

The Seattle filming locations of ‘Say Anything...’

The boombox scene was filmed in LA, but there’s plenty to see here

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Courtesy of Seattle Municipal Archives, item No. 177840

First of all: we regret to inform you that the iconic scene of Say Anything... with John Cusack holding the boombox over his head was actually filmed in Los Angeles. In fact, most of the scenes involving the actors were shot in L.A., while Seattle was used mainly for establishing shots and a few key moments.

Still, there are plenty of Seattle sights (and one Tacoma attraction) that make their way into the film and the memories of those who love it. Just like the cassette tapes and big hair, a lot of the Seattle locations are relics of another time, but it's nice to know we can always go back with a little help from Cameron Crowe—who also directed the much more Seattle-centric Singles.

Despite a changing Seattle, many of the buildings from Say Anything... are still standing—even though as of 2019, the film is a whole 30 years old. (Not the Alaskan Way Viaduct, though. RIP.)

Don’t worry, there are other Seattle-set films that weren’t totally filmed in Los Angeles or Vancouver, BC. We’ve also mapped out Sleepless in Seattle and 10 Things I Hate About You for all your local film tourism needs.

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Corey's House

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Corey, played by Lili Taylor, calls this Ballard house home in the film. It's still there, though there's now a pretty large neighbor next door. Still has a great view of Shilshole Bay, though.

Address is approximate.

Two Craftsman-style houses along a wide street with a cloudy sky in the background. Sarah Anne Lloyd

Waiting for the Interurban

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The first lyrics in the song that plays over the credits are, "This may come as a shocking surprise." That's pretty apt now since one of the next images is a shot of Fremont's iconic Waiting For The Interurban with a now-impossible backdrop that includes a clear look out on Lake Union. Today, there's a few big buildings and a Blue Moon Burgers blocking that view.

Wallingford Custom Framing and Assistance League Thrift Shop

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On his way to graduation, Lloyd drives by Wallingford Custom Framing and the Assistance League thrift shop in one of the converted homes along 45th Street. Today Assistance League is still there—it even took over the old Custom Framing house—and right next door is Tilth.

Two Craftsman-style houses along an arterial street. The one to the left is partially obscured by a tree. Sarah Anne Lloyd

Lakeview Boulevard Overpass

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The cassette in Lloyd's tape deck breaks down as he drives over this bridge into Seattle. Continuity is not Cameron Crowe's friend here as the very next shot shows the car driving past houses. If you're wondering what happened to that “Welcome to Seattle” sign, it's not real—this bridge is kind of in the middle of the city, and in real life, there’s just a sign warning you to not throw stuff off it.

The entrance to a freeway overpass on a sunny day. A sign to the right warns of a fine for throwing stuff off the bridge. There are cranes and skyscrapers in the background. Sarah Anne Lloyd

Auditorium Cleaners

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Diane and her father drive down North 35th Street past the former Auditorium Cleaners on their way to graduation. The Hand That Rocks The Cradle also filmed a scene right here. The cleaning place—along with its iconic sign—is long gone, and now it’s home to local-goods boutique Show Pony.

Westlake Center

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It's called “Bell Square Mall” in the film, but the site of Lloyd and Diane's first date is actually Westlake Center. Lloyd drives past the entrance on Pine Street between Fourth and Fifth Avenue. Look for Cameron Crowe as a pedestrian in front of the mall as Lloyd drives by.

A post shared by M Quah 안히영 (@one.sixfour) on

Alaskan Way Viaduct

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As Lloyd and Diane drive Mike home after the party date, they drive on the Alaskan Way Viaduct toward Downtown Seattle. The skyline appears as we transition from late night to early evening.

This location has only recently disappeared—in fact, we’re still in the end stages of losing it as crews chomp the thing down.

Alex Garland for Curbed Seattle

Dick's Drive-In

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In a cut scene available on the DVD, we see Lloyd's car pass by the Wallingford Dick's Drive In as they search for Mike's house.

Guild 45th Theatre

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While driving around town in a post-breakup haze (and speaking into a tape recorder), Lloyd drives past the Guild 45th Theatre in Wallingford. While the theater closed in 2017, although it’s still a recognizable fixture of the Wallingford drag.

Seattleites will appreciate that almost immediately after passing it, he drives by Westlake Center in downtown.

Bob's Java Jive

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Lloyd past a weird teapot-shaped building while sorting himself out after his break-up with Diane. This is Bob's Java Jive at 2102 South Tacoma Way in Tacoma. The historic landmark was also used as a location in the film I Love You To Death.

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Corey's House

Corey, played by Lili Taylor, calls this Ballard house home in the film. It's still there, though there's now a pretty large neighbor next door. Still has a great view of Shilshole Bay, though.

Address is approximate.

Two Craftsman-style houses along a wide street with a cloudy sky in the background. Sarah Anne Lloyd

Waiting for the Interurban

The first lyrics in the song that plays over the credits are, "This may come as a shocking surprise." That's pretty apt now since one of the next images is a shot of Fremont's iconic Waiting For The Interurban with a now-impossible backdrop that includes a clear look out on Lake Union. Today, there's a few big buildings and a Blue Moon Burgers blocking that view.

Wallingford Custom Framing and Assistance League Thrift Shop

On his way to graduation, Lloyd drives by Wallingford Custom Framing and the Assistance League thrift shop in one of the converted homes along 45th Street. Today Assistance League is still there—it even took over the old Custom Framing house—and right next door is Tilth.

Two Craftsman-style houses along an arterial street. The one to the left is partially obscured by a tree. Sarah Anne Lloyd

Lakeview Boulevard Overpass

The cassette in Lloyd's tape deck breaks down as he drives over this bridge into Seattle. Continuity is not Cameron Crowe's friend here as the very next shot shows the car driving past houses. If you're wondering what happened to that “Welcome to Seattle” sign, it's not real—this bridge is kind of in the middle of the city, and in real life, there’s just a sign warning you to not throw stuff off it.

The entrance to a freeway overpass on a sunny day. A sign to the right warns of a fine for throwing stuff off the bridge. There are cranes and skyscrapers in the background. Sarah Anne Lloyd

Auditorium Cleaners

Diane and her father drive down North 35th Street past the former Auditorium Cleaners on their way to graduation. The Hand That Rocks The Cradle also filmed a scene right here. The cleaning place—along with its iconic sign—is long gone, and now it’s home to local-goods boutique Show Pony.

Westlake Center

It's called “Bell Square Mall” in the film, but the site of Lloyd and Diane's first date is actually Westlake Center. Lloyd drives past the entrance on Pine Street between Fourth and Fifth Avenue. Look for Cameron Crowe as a pedestrian in front of the mall as Lloyd drives by.

A post shared by M Quah 안히영 (@one.sixfour) on

Alaskan Way Viaduct

As Lloyd and Diane drive Mike home after the party date, they drive on the Alaskan Way Viaduct toward Downtown Seattle. The skyline appears as we transition from late night to early evening.

This location has only recently disappeared—in fact, we’re still in the end stages of losing it as crews chomp the thing down.

Alex Garland for Curbed Seattle

Dick's Drive-In

In a cut scene available on the DVD, we see Lloyd's car pass by the Wallingford Dick's Drive In as they search for Mike's house.

Guild 45th Theatre

While driving around town in a post-breakup haze (and speaking into a tape recorder), Lloyd drives past the Guild 45th Theatre in Wallingford. While the theater closed in 2017, although it’s still a recognizable fixture of the Wallingford drag.

Seattleites will appreciate that almost immediately after passing it, he drives by Westlake Center in downtown.

Bob's Java Jive

Lloyd past a weird teapot-shaped building while sorting himself out after his break-up with Diane. This is Bob's Java Jive at 2102 South Tacoma Way in Tacoma. The historic landmark was also used as a location in the film I Love You To Death.