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A row of trees span either side of a brick plaza. Brick and stone buildings are behind the trees on either side. Shutterstock

The most memorable Seattle spots from ‘Singles’

Some are even still with us

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More than 25 years ago, Cameron Crowe's film Singles brought a snapshot of Seattle to the masses. Nationally it’s, as Rolling Stone called it, “the definitive grunge film,” but Seattle residents may know it as the movie that mapped Queen Anne next to West Seattle. In retrospect it might look a little hokey—it is, after all, a grunge rom-com—but it has a 72 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, so it must hold up on some level.

Even if it's cringe-worthy to see all that flannel, it's worth a rewatch for all of the memorable moments and locales that you'll remember (or not remember). A surprising number of them are still holding on—or at least did for a long time. Here's a handy map for your self-guided Singles location tour.

Whatever you do, though: Don’t plan a big outdoor movie event at the apartment building. Someone already tried that and was... not successful.

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Occidental Park

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Kyra Sedgwick and Campbell Scott’s characters take a stroll by this park as they get to know one another. It’s also the location of the movie poster with the bigger cast in it.

“He”

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Kyra Sedwick's character chats with her friend while sitting next to the statue often referred to as “Old Man on Bench.” Its official name is “He,” and there’s another statue across the plaza of a woman called—surprise—”she.”

Chandler's Crabhouse

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Campbell Scott’s character tries, and fails, to pitch his monorail idea to Mayor Tom Skerritt while dining at Chandler's.

The “Singles Building”

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This building in east Capitol Hill is where most of the film's main characters called home. Back in 2015, there was an ill-fated attempt to stage a screening of the film on VHS in the not-very-big courtyard, but it was canceled after more than a thousand people RSVPed.

Sedgwick and Scott's characters first meet at a live show at Re-Bar, which is still alive and kicking (for now, at least). At the time, the venue was just a couple of years old.

OK Hotel

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The lobby of the OK Hotel—then a legendary music venue—was transformed into the coffee shop frequented by the main characters. It closed down after the 2001 Nisqually quake, and now it's a residential building, although a gallery on the ground floor still hosts art and performances on First Thursdays.

California and Charlestown

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This West Seattle corner is where the big car accident happens. Two out of the four corners look basically the same, although the diner and the long-vacant auto parts store were both demolished and replaced with large developments.

Gas Works Park

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Not much has changed at Gas Works Park since Singles came out in 1992.

J&M Cafe

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The newsstand where Scott and Sedgwick’s characters run into each other doesn’t actually exist—it was created on the side of the iconic J&M Cafe. Like many of the film’s locations, the J&M is also a music venue.

Clinton's Auto Service

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Sedgwick's character gets her car repaired here, all the way on the other side of Seattle from where she was driving. Imagine the tow truck fees!

Clinton’s hung on for a number of years after the movie came out, but eventually closed in 2019.

The Off Ramp/El Corazon

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The spot of Soundgarden's in-film performance is now known as El Corazon, but when it was a grunge hotspot, it was known as the Off Ramp. This structure will eventually come down, although the owners worked out a deal to open a venue in the new building.

Occidental Park

Kyra Sedgwick and Campbell Scott’s characters take a stroll by this park as they get to know one another. It’s also the location of the movie poster with the bigger cast in it.

“He”

Kyra Sedwick's character chats with her friend while sitting next to the statue often referred to as “Old Man on Bench.” Its official name is “He,” and there’s another statue across the plaza of a woman called—surprise—”she.”

Chandler's Crabhouse

Campbell Scott’s character tries, and fails, to pitch his monorail idea to Mayor Tom Skerritt while dining at Chandler's.

The “Singles Building”

This building in east Capitol Hill is where most of the film's main characters called home. Back in 2015, there was an ill-fated attempt to stage a screening of the film on VHS in the not-very-big courtyard, but it was canceled after more than a thousand people RSVPed.

Re-Bar

Sedgwick and Scott's characters first meet at a live show at Re-Bar, which is still alive and kicking (for now, at least). At the time, the venue was just a couple of years old.

OK Hotel

The lobby of the OK Hotel—then a legendary music venue—was transformed into the coffee shop frequented by the main characters. It closed down after the 2001 Nisqually quake, and now it's a residential building, although a gallery on the ground floor still hosts art and performances on First Thursdays.

California and Charlestown

This West Seattle corner is where the big car accident happens. Two out of the four corners look basically the same, although the diner and the long-vacant auto parts store were both demolished and replaced with large developments.

Gas Works Park

Not much has changed at Gas Works Park since Singles came out in 1992.

J&M Cafe

The newsstand where Scott and Sedgwick’s characters run into each other doesn’t actually exist—it was created on the side of the iconic J&M Cafe. Like many of the film’s locations, the J&M is also a music venue.

Clinton's Auto Service

Sedgwick's character gets her car repaired here, all the way on the other side of Seattle from where she was driving. Imagine the tow truck fees!

Clinton’s hung on for a number of years after the movie came out, but eventually closed in 2019.

The Off Ramp/El Corazon

The spot of Soundgarden's in-film performance is now known as El Corazon, but when it was a grunge hotspot, it was known as the Off Ramp. This structure will eventually come down, although the owners worked out a deal to open a venue in the new building.