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Updating the Curbed Map of Where to Swim in Seattle

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Last year we mapped out some of the best spots to go for a swim around Seattle when the weather turns nice. Usually that's mid-July but, have you been outside lately? It's been summer weather for a few weeks now and there's no time to delay. Everybody needs to get in the water. We've gone ahead and expanding our list of essential swimming spots to twenty. We've also expanded the range to some of the best spots on the Eastside, down by Renton and even one in Redmond. There's no shortage of swimming pools and cool lakes in the area. Let this be your swimtastic starting point to a great summer.


· Mapping The 10 Best Outdoor Swimming Spots Around Seattle [CS]
Image: Seattle Municipal Archives

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Green Lake Park

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Which will it be today? The East Lake Beach, or the West Lake Beach? Both include lifeguards who will show up at 11a.m. on June 21st to anticipate the odds of you getting too drunk to save yourself.

Lake Union Park Beach

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In-city swimming right in the middle of Lake Union's action within feeling like you have to evade boats at every turn. The beach is tucked away on the Southwest corner and perfect for launching a kayak as well as wading in the water with kids.

Ballard Commons Park

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Maybe you don't feel like swimming or have kids, but you need to get out of the house. If you have kids, take them to a spray park! If you don't, you can run around the seashells and feel like a big kid for few minutes.

Golden Gardens Park

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It can get crowded and trying to park here at the wrong time of the day will take up most of your plans, but if you can settle in, it's a fun, family beach full of things to do (Just don't hang out there at night, it's been known to get a little sketchy).

Seward Park Beach

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Wander through the Magnificent Forest, go for a bike ride around the 2.4 mile paved path while taking in views of Mt. Rainier, watch some crazy birds, go for a long swim, and end the day with a picnic. Your summer days will not be wasted. Check out our bird checklist to get you motivated.

Alki Beach Park

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This is where Chief Seattle greeted the first white settlers in November of 1851! Sip on a spiked smoothie as you take in a panoramic view of people wearing hardly any clothing, Puget Sound, the Olympic Mountains, and downtown Seattle.

Fremont Rope Swing

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Aaaaah summer! Time to drink pitchers of Belgian ale and swing from a tree into the Lake Washington Ship Canal. Don't get hit by a boat or bird poop.

Colman Pool

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This is a public pool that will most likely be full of kids and teens. You don't have to swim if you don't want to because, uh, is that a candy bar floating on top? Instead, relax and take in the view of Puget Sound as you play with your phone.

Mounger Pool

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Mounger Pool has two great pools. The Big Pool has a 50-foot corkscrew slide, and the Little Pool, warmer and shallower, is great for relaxing and teaching your little tadpoles.

Madison Park Beach

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One of the most popular swimming beaches in Seattle, Madison Beach has a grassy area where sunbathers can relax and enjoy a stunning view of Lake Washington. Get out your big awkward easel, oil paints, hand stretched canvas, and paint all the beautiful people enjoying the sun on this beach in Capitol Hill. Your wool (on a summer day?) beret is kinda old and full of holes so you might want to get a new one.

Warren G. Magnuson Beach

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Warren G. Magnuson Park swimming beach offers a tiny pebble shoreline-your gateway to refreshing waters that average 67 degrees during summer months. There's a swim raft you can reach or if you're feeling lazy just go hang out in the wading pool.

Ballard Community Pool

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For when you want to keep things indoors, this community pool offer a wide array of aquatics programs for all ages. Of course, the rope swing is the main attraction but the tubular slide is also a pretty awesome way to hit the water.

Madrona Park Beach

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Madrona Park and Beach is located on the waterfront on Lake Washington. The park include a wooded hillside that slopes down to a grassy beach and swimming area, where lifeguards are on duty in the summer. The low diving board and swimming raft are highlights.

Matthews Beach Park

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An ideal location for gatherings, work up a sweat at the volleyball net or running on the Burke-Gilman Trail and then take a dip in Lake Washington at Seattle’s largest freshwater bathing beach.

Pritchard Island Beach

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A small, quiet beach on the Western Shore of Lake Washington. Amenities include a swimming raft and lifeguards on duty in the summer. A lot of people find this to be a nice alternative to the Atlantic City beach to the south, as there are no boat ramps here.

Henry Moses Aquatic Center

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There are 26-feet high orange and blue water slides, two separate pools, a 9,000-square-foot leisure pool and a 3,300-square-foot, six-lane lap pool just for starters. The leisure pool includes popular features such as a zero-depth entry, wave machine, water spray play area, lazy river, island lagoon, two water slides, a water play structure, toddler water area, and numerous spray features.

Chism Beach Park

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Bellevue's largest waterfront swimming spot offers plenty of water activities for all different types, including floating dock for older swimmers and wading areas for the youngins.

Meydenbauer Beach Park

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This expanded beach park features an enchanting boathouse that will evoke memories from the past, or so the website tells us. There's a 50-meter swim lane for the serious swimmers as well as a kiddie swim area.

Enatai Beach Park

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Looking for some boating adventures? You can rent canoes and kayaks here from Cascade Canoe and Kayak and paddle up the Mercer Slough. Plenty of swimming space, too.

Idylwood Park

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Dwarfed by Marymoor Park, Idylwood is a nice sandy beach with a playground and tons of shady picnic tables. Make sure you get there early cause parking gets nutty.

Green Lake Park

Which will it be today? The East Lake Beach, or the West Lake Beach? Both include lifeguards who will show up at 11a.m. on June 21st to anticipate the odds of you getting too drunk to save yourself.

Lake Union Park Beach

In-city swimming right in the middle of Lake Union's action within feeling like you have to evade boats at every turn. The beach is tucked away on the Southwest corner and perfect for launching a kayak as well as wading in the water with kids.

Ballard Commons Park

Maybe you don't feel like swimming or have kids, but you need to get out of the house. If you have kids, take them to a spray park! If you don't, you can run around the seashells and feel like a big kid for few minutes.

Golden Gardens Park

It can get crowded and trying to park here at the wrong time of the day will take up most of your plans, but if you can settle in, it's a fun, family beach full of things to do (Just don't hang out there at night, it's been known to get a little sketchy).

Seward Park Beach

Wander through the Magnificent Forest, go for a bike ride around the 2.4 mile paved path while taking in views of Mt. Rainier, watch some crazy birds, go for a long swim, and end the day with a picnic. Your summer days will not be wasted. Check out our bird checklist to get you motivated.

Alki Beach Park

This is where Chief Seattle greeted the first white settlers in November of 1851! Sip on a spiked smoothie as you take in a panoramic view of people wearing hardly any clothing, Puget Sound, the Olympic Mountains, and downtown Seattle.

Fremont Rope Swing

Aaaaah summer! Time to drink pitchers of Belgian ale and swing from a tree into the Lake Washington Ship Canal. Don't get hit by a boat or bird poop.

Colman Pool

This is a public pool that will most likely be full of kids and teens. You don't have to swim if you don't want to because, uh, is that a candy bar floating on top? Instead, relax and take in the view of Puget Sound as you play with your phone.

Mounger Pool

Mounger Pool has two great pools. The Big Pool has a 50-foot corkscrew slide, and the Little Pool, warmer and shallower, is great for relaxing and teaching your little tadpoles.

Madison Park Beach

One of the most popular swimming beaches in Seattle, Madison Beach has a grassy area where sunbathers can relax and enjoy a stunning view of Lake Washington. Get out your big awkward easel, oil paints, hand stretched canvas, and paint all the beautiful people enjoying the sun on this beach in Capitol Hill. Your wool (on a summer day?) beret is kinda old and full of holes so you might want to get a new one.

Warren G. Magnuson Beach

Warren G. Magnuson Park swimming beach offers a tiny pebble shoreline-your gateway to refreshing waters that average 67 degrees during summer months. There's a swim raft you can reach or if you're feeling lazy just go hang out in the wading pool.

Ballard Community Pool

For when you want to keep things indoors, this community pool offer a wide array of aquatics programs for all ages. Of course, the rope swing is the main attraction but the tubular slide is also a pretty awesome way to hit the water.

Madrona Park Beach

Madrona Park and Beach is located on the waterfront on Lake Washington. The park include a wooded hillside that slopes down to a grassy beach and swimming area, where lifeguards are on duty in the summer. The low diving board and swimming raft are highlights.

Matthews Beach Park

An ideal location for gatherings, work up a sweat at the volleyball net or running on the Burke-Gilman Trail and then take a dip in Lake Washington at Seattle’s largest freshwater bathing beach.

Pritchard Island Beach

A small, quiet beach on the Western Shore of Lake Washington. Amenities include a swimming raft and lifeguards on duty in the summer. A lot of people find this to be a nice alternative to the Atlantic City beach to the south, as there are no boat ramps here.

Henry Moses Aquatic Center

There are 26-feet high orange and blue water slides, two separate pools, a 9,000-square-foot leisure pool and a 3,300-square-foot, six-lane lap pool just for starters. The leisure pool includes popular features such as a zero-depth entry, wave machine, water spray play area, lazy river, island lagoon, two water slides, a water play structure, toddler water area, and numerous spray features.

Chism Beach Park

Bellevue's largest waterfront swimming spot offers plenty of water activities for all different types, including floating dock for older swimmers and wading areas for the youngins.

Meydenbauer Beach Park

This expanded beach park features an enchanting boathouse that will evoke memories from the past, or so the website tells us. There's a 50-meter swim lane for the serious swimmers as well as a kiddie swim area.

Enatai Beach Park

Looking for some boating adventures? You can rent canoes and kayaks here from Cascade Canoe and Kayak and paddle up the Mercer Slough. Plenty of swimming space, too.

Idylwood Park

Dwarfed by Marymoor Park, Idylwood is a nice sandy beach with a playground and tons of shady picnic tables. Make sure you get there early cause parking gets nutty.