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A log fence curves along the side of a bluff with a view of water, with mountains in the distance.
Dash Point State Park.
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14 gorgeous waterfront campgrounds near Seattle

Take a beach vacation

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Dash Point State Park.
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Seattle is bookended by a bay and a massive lake, so it’s surrounded by beautiful water views. But there’s something special about getting out there and camping next to the water, even if you’re just an hour or two away from home. The Puget Sound region has something to offer for most waterfront campers, whether saltwater or freshwater, bay or river, hiking or fishing. Plus: You don’t end up paying the same premium you normally would for waterfront accomodations.

Because of our topography and tides, many of these campsites are located on bluffs above the water, but they’re all at most a quick walk down to the shoreline.

For those wanting a more intense, immersive waterfront getaway, there are even a couple of sites where no cars are allowed at all, including one island only accessible by boat (don’t worry, there’s a shuttle option). So grab your kayak and dry bag and get ready for an adventure—and if you’re looking for more stops, the state has a whole network of campsites along the Cascadia Marine Trail.

All of the sites on this map are within two hours of Seattle—and many of them are an hour or less—and some are even accessible by transit.

Want to go camping but not... camping-camping? The area has plenty of parks with cabin rentals, some with beautiful waterfront locations of their own.

Map points are ordered north to south.

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1. Deception Pass State Park

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Deception Pass State Park
Oak Harbor, WA 98277

Deception Pass is one of the Seattle area’s most iconic campgrounds, and sites fill up fast—usually months in advance—although some first-come, first-served sites are set aside for people arriving by bike, foot, or boat. It’s lined by a few different bodies of water: The pass itself separates Skagit Bay and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and the park also contains Cranberry Lake for fishing and swimming.

For a full waterfront experience, the Ben Ure cabin is on the coastline of a small island only accessible by human-powered watercraft.

2. Fort Casey Historical State Park

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1280 Engle Rd
Coupeville, WA 98239
(360) 678-4519
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Washington has a few state parks built around former military bases, but Fort Casey is the closest to Seattle out of the “Triangle of Fire” (that’s Casey, along with Fort Worden and Fort Flagler). These parks have plenty of former military buildings to explore, like old bunkers and gunnery stations. A small selection of campsites at Casey include a few pull-through beachfront sites and others tucked back in the woods.

3. Camano Island State Park

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Camano Island State Park
Camano, WA 98282

In addition to some adorable cabins (like its neighbor, the ever-popular Cama Beach State Park), Camano Island State Park has 88 standard campsites, plus a couple set aside for hikers and bikers, situated, like many state park campsites, on a bluff above the water. All of the campsites are first-come, first-served.

4. Kitsap Memorial State Park

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202 NE Park St
Poulsbo, WA 98370
(360) 779-3205
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This park along 1,797 feet of saltwater shoreline on the Hood Canal has fewer than 40 campsites, plus a few cabins. Campers here can go hiking along a small selection of trails, check out tidepools, and harvest clams and oysters (although watch out for those red tide warnings).

5. Dosewallips State Park

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306996 US-101
Brinnon, WA 98320
(360) 796-4415
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Dosewallips State Park has plenty of shoreline for everyone, with 5,500 feet of saltwater shoreline along the Hood Canal and 5,400 feet of freshwater shoreline along the Dosewallips River. Those looking for more of a glamping experience can stay in one of their platform tents (or cabins), although it has plenty of standard campsites.

6. Scenic Beach State Park

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9565 Scenic Beach Rd NW
Seabeck, WA 98380
(360) 830-5079
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Yet another park along the Hood Canal, Scenic Beach State Park is both dog-friendly and, as State Parks claims, “romantic,” so there’s really something for everyone here. It has around 50 campsites with a couple set aside for hikers and bikers. While the beach is appropriately scenic, it’s a little smaller than some of its Hood Canal neighbors, with 1,500 feet of waterfront.

7. Blake Island Marine State Park

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(360) 731-8330
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For the true waterfront experience, Blake Island is only accessible by boat—so grab a kayak and invest in a dry bag and catch the Southworth ferry (or hit up an Argosy shuttle from the Seattle waterfront, or go by motorboat, dealer’s choice). Three of the 47 sites are set aside for those coming by kayak or canoe, though. Being on an island that’s pretty much all park means five whole miles of waterfront.

Blake Island is also home to Tillicum Village, a Coast Salish cultural center and tourist attraction.

8. Belfair State Park

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Belfair State Park
Belfair, WA 98528

Belfair is one of the bigger camping parks along the Hood Canal, and has three loops—including a beach loop with waterfront sites, although all three border Little Mission Creek. Like many of its neighbors, it has a site set aside for those arriving by wind- or human-powered watercraft, as long as the boat doesn’t need a dock.

9. Maury Island Marine Park

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(206) 296-0100
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This King County Park on Maury Island (which is not an island, but a peninsula off Vashon Island) is one of the largest undeveloped properties on Puget Sound, with a mile of waterfront. Seven primitive campsites require packing in your own potable water, and are accessible by hike (parking is three quarters of a mile away, or take the bus on a weekday), kayak, or bike.

10. Twanoh State Park

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Out of all the Hood Canal campsites, Twanoh stands out for its warm water temperatures and plentiful shellfish. The campground has 25 standard campsites, 22 full-hookup sites, and one site set aside for those arriving by human- or wind-powered watercraft.

11. Saltwater State Park

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25205 8th Pl S
Des Moines, WA 98198
(253) 661-4956
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Saltwater State Park is in Des Moines in South King County, so it’s about as close as you can get to Seattle for waterfront camping. It has 1,445 feet of shoreline along the Puget Sound (including sandy beaches), plus hiking trails and 47 campsites.

12. Dash Point State Park

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5700 SW Dash Point Rd
Federal Way, WA 98023
(253) 661-4955
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Located in Federal Way right where King County meets Pierce County, Dash Point has dramatic tide changes that offer a massive sand flat at low tide and pier fishing at high tide. 3,300 feet of shoreline offer plenty of beach to explore. The campground has 114 standard campsites and 27 utility campsites.

13. Jarrell Cove State Park

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391 E Wingert Rd
Shelton, WA 98584
(360) 426-9226
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Accessible only by bridge or boat, this campground on Harstine Island in south Puget Sound offers access to both the Case Inlet and Pickering Passage, making it a popular destination for swimming, boating, and fishing alike. It has an amphitheater and sports courts for on-land activity, too.

The park has 19 standard campsites and two partial-hookup sites, although only six sites total allow reservations—the rest are first-come, first-served.

14. Joemma Beach State Park

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20001 Bay Rd Kp S
Longbranch, WA 98351
(253) 884-1944
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On the Key Peninsula—a land pass stretching to the south beyond the Kitsap Peninsula—Joemma Beach State Park has 3,000 feet of saltwater shoreline in the south Puget Sound, and offers crabbing, fishing, and sea star viewing. It’s a small campground, with no reservations required for the 19 primitive tent sites, three sites for hikers and bikers, and for people arriving by human-powered watercraft.

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1. Deception Pass State Park

Deception Pass State Park, Oak Harbor, WA 98277

Deception Pass is one of the Seattle area’s most iconic campgrounds, and sites fill up fast—usually months in advance—although some first-come, first-served sites are set aside for people arriving by bike, foot, or boat. It’s lined by a few different bodies of water: The pass itself separates Skagit Bay and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and the park also contains Cranberry Lake for fishing and swimming.

For a full waterfront experience, the Ben Ure cabin is on the coastline of a small island only accessible by human-powered watercraft.

Deception Pass State Park
Oak Harbor, WA 98277

2. Fort Casey Historical State Park

1280 Engle Rd, Coupeville, WA 98239

Washington has a few state parks built around former military bases, but Fort Casey is the closest to Seattle out of the “Triangle of Fire” (that’s Casey, along with Fort Worden and Fort Flagler). These parks have plenty of former military buildings to explore, like old bunkers and gunnery stations. A small selection of campsites at Casey include a few pull-through beachfront sites and others tucked back in the woods.

1280 Engle Rd
Coupeville, WA 98239

3. Camano Island State Park

Camano Island State Park, Camano, WA 98282

In addition to some adorable cabins (like its neighbor, the ever-popular Cama Beach State Park), Camano Island State Park has 88 standard campsites, plus a couple set aside for hikers and bikers, situated, like many state park campsites, on a bluff above the water. All of the campsites are first-come, first-served.

Camano Island State Park
Camano, WA 98282

4. Kitsap Memorial State Park

202 NE Park St, Poulsbo, WA 98370

This park along 1,797 feet of saltwater shoreline on the Hood Canal has fewer than 40 campsites, plus a few cabins. Campers here can go hiking along a small selection of trails, check out tidepools, and harvest clams and oysters (although watch out for those red tide warnings).

202 NE Park St
Poulsbo, WA 98370

5. Dosewallips State Park

306996 US-101, Brinnon, WA 98320

Dosewallips State Park has plenty of shoreline for everyone, with 5,500 feet of saltwater shoreline along the Hood Canal and 5,400 feet of freshwater shoreline along the Dosewallips River. Those looking for more of a glamping experience can stay in one of their platform tents (or cabins), although it has plenty of standard campsites.

306996 US-101
Brinnon, WA 98320

6. Scenic Beach State Park

9565 Scenic Beach Rd NW, Seabeck, WA 98380

Yet another park along the Hood Canal, Scenic Beach State Park is both dog-friendly and, as State Parks claims, “romantic,” so there’s really something for everyone here. It has around 50 campsites with a couple set aside for hikers and bikers. While the beach is appropriately scenic, it’s a little smaller than some of its Hood Canal neighbors, with 1,500 feet of waterfront.

9565 Scenic Beach Rd NW
Seabeck, WA 98380

7. Blake Island Marine State Park

Manchester, WA 98353

For the true waterfront experience, Blake Island is only accessible by boat—so grab a kayak and invest in a dry bag and catch the Southworth ferry (or hit up an Argosy shuttle from the Seattle waterfront, or go by motorboat, dealer’s choice). Three of the 47 sites are set aside for those coming by kayak or canoe, though. Being on an island that’s pretty much all park means five whole miles of waterfront.

Blake Island is also home to Tillicum Village, a Coast Salish cultural center and tourist attraction.

8. Belfair State Park

Belfair State Park, Belfair, WA 98528

Belfair is one of the bigger camping parks along the Hood Canal, and has three loops—including a beach loop with waterfront sites, although all three border Little Mission Creek. Like many of its neighbors, it has a site set aside for those arriving by wind- or human-powered watercraft, as long as the boat doesn’t need a dock.

Belfair State Park
Belfair, WA 98528

9. Maury Island Marine Park

Vashon, WA 98070

This King County Park on Maury Island (which is not an island, but a peninsula off Vashon Island) is one of the largest undeveloped properties on Puget Sound, with a mile of waterfront. Seven primitive campsites require packing in your own potable water, and are accessible by hike (parking is three quarters of a mile away, or take the bus on a weekday), kayak, or bike.

10. Twanoh State Park

Washington 98528

Out of all the Hood Canal campsites, Twanoh stands out for its warm water temperatures and plentiful shellfish. The campground has 25 standard campsites, 22 full-hookup sites, and one site set aside for those arriving by human- or wind-powered watercraft.

11. Saltwater State Park

25205 8th Pl S, Des Moines, WA 98198

Saltwater State Park is in Des Moines in South King County, so it’s about as close as you can get to Seattle for waterfront camping. It has 1,445 feet of shoreline along the Puget Sound (including sandy beaches), plus hiking trails and 47 campsites.

25205 8th Pl S
Des Moines, WA 98198

12. Dash Point State Park

5700 SW Dash Point Rd, Federal Way, WA 98023

Located in Federal Way right where King County meets Pierce County, Dash Point has dramatic tide changes that offer a massive sand flat at low tide and pier fishing at high tide. 3,300 feet of shoreline offer plenty of beach to explore. The campground has 114 standard campsites and 27 utility campsites.

5700 SW Dash Point Rd
Federal Way, WA 98023

13. Jarrell Cove State Park

391 E Wingert Rd, Shelton, WA 98584

Accessible only by bridge or boat, this campground on Harstine Island in south Puget Sound offers access to both the Case Inlet and Pickering Passage, making it a popular destination for swimming, boating, and fishing alike. It has an amphitheater and sports courts for on-land activity, too.

The park has 19 standard campsites and two partial-hookup sites, although only six sites total allow reservations—the rest are first-come, first-served.

391 E Wingert Rd
Shelton, WA 98584

14. Joemma Beach State Park

20001 Bay Rd Kp S, Longbranch, WA 98351

On the Key Peninsula—a land pass stretching to the south beyond the Kitsap Peninsula—Joemma Beach State Park has 3,000 feet of saltwater shoreline in the south Puget Sound, and offers crabbing, fishing, and sea star viewing. It’s a small campground, with no reservations required for the 19 primitive tent sites, three sites for hikers and bikers, and for people arriving by human-powered watercraft.

20001 Bay Rd Kp S
Longbranch, WA 98351